08-08-05

Is your printer watching you

 

http://www.eff.org/Privacy/printers/ In an effort to identify counterfeiters, the US government has succeeded in persuading some color laser printer manufacturers to encode each page with identifying information. That means that without your knowledge or consent, an act you assume is private could become public. A communication tool you're using in everyday life could become a tool for government surveillance. And what's worse, there are no laws to prevent abuse.

The ACLU recently issued a report revealing that the FBI has amassed more than 1,100 pages of documents on the organization since 2001, as well as documents concerning other non-violent groups, including Greenpeace and United for Peace and Justice. In the current political climate, it's not hard to imagine the government using the ability to determine who may have printed what document for purposes other than identifying counterfeiters.

Yet there are no laws to stop the Secret Service from using printer codes to secretly trace the origin of non-currency documents; only the privacy policy of your printer manufacturer currently protects you (if indeed such a policy exists). And no law regulates what sort of documents the Secret Service or any other domestic or foreign government agency is permitted to request for identification, not to mention how such a forensics tool could be developed and implemented in printers in the first place.

ask you to print and send us test sheets from your color laser printer and/or a color laser printer at your local print shop

the dutch did it since 2004 http://www.pcworld.idg.com.au/index.php/id;1002274598

the technical paper http://www.eff.org/Privacy/printers/wp.php


23:40 Gepost door technology changes fast not a lot | Permalink | Commentaren (0) |  Facebook |

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